Chronology
from the book Hanna-Barbera Cartoons

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1936
To Spring becomes William Hanna's directorial debut for Harman-Ising, released through Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

1937
Joseph Barbera and William Hanna meet in the offices of MGM.

1938
William Hanna directs several Captain and the Kids cartoons for MGM.

1939
Hanna and Barbera begin working together on a new animated short starring a cat and a mouse entitled Puss Gets the Boot.

1940
Puss Gets the Boot, directed by Hanna and Barbera, receives an Academy Award nomination. They also direct two new cartoons for MGM entitled Swing Social and Gallopin' Gals.

1941
Tom and Jerry are officially christened in a cartoon directed by Hanna and Barbera, entitled Midnight Snack.

Tom and Jerry receive an Academy Award nomination for the cartoon The Night Before Christmas, directed by Hanna and Barbera. They also direct new cartoons entitled The Goose Goes South and Officer Pooch.

1942
Hanna and Barbera direct the following Tom and Jerry releases this year entitled Fraidy Cat, Dog Trouble, Puss N' Toots, The Bowling Alley Cat, and Fine Feathered Friend.

1943
Hanna and Barbera direct War Dogs for MGM.

The first of seven Academy Awards, and the first of four Academy Awards in a row, is given to the Tom and Jerry cartoon Yankee Doodle Mouse, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1944
Tom and Jerry win their second Academy Award for Mouse Trouble, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1945
Tom and Jerry win the Academy Award again with Quiet Please!, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

Anchors Aweigh is produced and contains a historic motion picture scene combining animation with live-action. Gene Kelly and Jerry share the screen in a dance sequence together and Tom has a brief cameo appearance.

1946
Tom and Jerry win their fourth Academy Award for Cat Concerto, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1947
Tom and Jerry receive another Academy Award nomination for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Mouse, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1948
Tom and Jerry receive their fifth Academy Award for The Little Orphan, directed by Hanna and Barbera. They also direct a new cartoon entitled Make Mine Freedom.

1949
Tom and Jerry receive another Academy Award nomination for the Tom and Jerry cartoon Hatch Up Your Troubles, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1950
Tom and Jerry receive an Academy Award nomination for Jerry's Cousin, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1951
Tom and Jerry win their sixth Academy Award for The Two Mouseketeers, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1952
Tom and Jerry win their seventh Academy Award, making it seven wins in ten years, with Johann Mouse, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1953
MGM releases Dangerous When Wet, which contains an animated/live-action sequence of Tom and Jerry swimming in perfect synchronization with Esther Williams.

1954
Tom and Jerry receive an Academy Award nomination for Touché, Pussycat, directed by Hanna and Barbera.

1955
Good Will to Men, a remake of Hugh Harman's 1939 cartoon entitled Peace On Earth, is directed by Hanna and Barbera and receives an Academy Award nomination.

1956
Gene Kelly returns to Hanna and Barbera with another animation project: to create the animation sequence in Invitation to the Dance, a MGM theatrical feature.

Hanna and Barbera produce for MGM Spike and Tyke, the father and son dog team from the Tom and Jerry cartoons. They appear in their very own cartoon entitled Give and Tyke.

1957
MGM closes the animation studio.

Hanna and Barbera open Hanna-Barbera Productions and begin work on Ruff and Reddy, their first animated series for television airing on NBC. Utilizing the "limited animation" technique that had been used years earlier to limit the costs of theatrical cartoons, Hanna-Barbera used only 4,000 cels per cartoon. This new technique would work well for Hanna-Barbera, considering they were only given $2,700 to produce a five-minute cartoon. Bill and Joe stepped up to the challenge and collectively figured out how to combine action with dialogue while limiting the amount of drawings used to simulate movement.

Hanna-Barbera's first animated television show Ruff and Reddy is released as a half-hour series on NBC. Starring the voices of Don Messick and Daws Butler, the series followed a serial-style format and was first aired in black and white but was soon broadcast in color. Hanna-Barbera had the foresight to produce all episodes in color.

1958
Hanna-Barbera releases The Huckleberry Hound Show. The show is comprised of six-and-a-half-minute separate cartoon segments starring Pixie and Dixie, Yogi Bear, and Huckleberry Hound.

Tot Watchers, the last MGM Tom and Jerry cartoon directed by Hanna and Barbera, is released.

1959
The Quick Draw McGraw Show is released featuring a new group of television cartoon stars--Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy and Snooper and Blabber--in separate segments. A common trivia question is the identity of a character found in the Quick Draw segments, a reoccurring orange dog named Snufŝes who makes happy noises and ŝoats in the air after receiving a dog biscuit.

Hanna-Barbera also releases its first theatrical cartoon called Loopy de Loop through Columbia Pictures.

1960
Often thought of as Hanna-Barbera's most famous creation, The Flintstones premieres in prime-time on ABC. This half-hour series runs for six seasons totaling 166 episodes.

The Huckleberry Hound Show wins an Emmy Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Children's Programming.

1961
Yogi Bear is so popular, he is given his own show. Hokey Wolf takes Yogi's place in The Huckleberry Hound Show. The Yogi Bear Show is a half-hour series featuring Yakky Doodle and Snagglepuss, the pink, quick-witted mountain lion thespian who must "exit, stage left" whenever he sees trouble.

Top Cat, Hanna-Barbera's second prime-time half-hour series, premieres on ABC.

1962
The Jetsons premieres on ABC in prime-time as the futuristic answer to The Flintstones. Unlike The Flintstones, Hanna-Barbera only produced twenty-four episodes of The Jetsons, an amazing statistic to many fans. The original episodes continued to run in syndication for twenty-two years, and it wasn't until 1984 that all new episodes were produced for television.

Hanna-Barbera releases a syndicated package entitled The Hanna-Barbera New Cartoon Series, which featured three new series of shorts: Wally Gator, Touché Turtle, and Lippy the Lion. Fifty-two episodes of each were produced.

1964
The Magilla Gorilla Show is released featuring two other cartoon segments, Ricochet Rabbit and Breezly and Sneezly. Punkin' Puss and Mush Mouse replaces Breezly and Sneezly in the fall.

Peter Potamus is released in syndication also featuring separate cartoon segments Breezly and Sneezly and Yippee, Yappee and Yahooey.

Hanna-Barbera releases Jonny Quest, a science-fiction action-adventure series that premiered on ABC. The series concept was by Doug Wildey, a respected comic book artist. A total of twenty-six half-hours were produced.

Hanna-Barbera releases Hey There, It's Yogi Bear through Columbia Pictures, Hanna-Barbera's first full-length animated feature.

1965
Hanna-Barbera releases a one-hour prime-time special entitled The World of Secret Squirrel and Atom Ant, to showcase a new Saturday morning series. This special features Hanna and Barbera landing a helicopter in the studio parking lot and racing into the studio to talk to the animated characters of Secret Squirrel and Atom Ant.

The Tom and Jerry Show is released by MGM as a half-hour series on CBS, featuring the theatrical Tom and Jerry cartoons directed by Hanna and Barbera while they were at MGM in the '40s and '50s. The series title would be changed to Tom and Jerry and Friends for syndication.

Hanna-Barbera releases the series The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show comprised of two half-hour blocks, the first starring Atom Ant along with separate segments for the Hillbilly Bears and Precious Pupp. The second half-hour featured Secret Squirrel with his sidekick Morocco Mole and two separate segments for Squiddly Diddly and Winsome Witch, airing on NBC.

Hanna-Barbera produces eighty-two five-and-a-half-minute episodes of Sinbad Jr. for Orion Pictures. The series was originally titled The Adventures of Sinbad Jr.

1966
The Peter Potamus Show is released as a half-hour series on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera releases The Man Called Flintstone, a feature-length animated theatrical spy thriller starring Fred Flintstone.

The final episode of The Flintstones original series airs.

Hanna-Barbera takes a new direction as it releases science-fiction action-adventure shows on CBS. The studio releases Frankenstein Jr. and The Impossibles, a half-hour series comprised of two Impossibles segments and one Frankenstein Jr. segment per episode.

Space Ghost and Dino Boy is released as a half-hour series on CBS comprised of two Space Ghost segments and one Dino Boy segment.

Space Kiddettes, featuring the adventures of four space-age youngsters, and the animated adventures of Young Samson and his dog Goliath are released as a half-hour series in syndication.

The studio also releases Alice in Wonderland, based on the original Lewis Carroll story.

Hanna-Barbera produces the half-hour series Laurel and Hardy for Wolper Productions and Larry Harmon Productions.

1967
Hanna-Barbera releases a half-hour action-adventure superhero series Birdman and the Galaxy Trio on NBC. This series was comprised of two Birdman segments and one Galaxy Trio segment per half-hour.

The Herculoids, Moby Dick and Mighty Mightor and Shazzan are released as a half-hour series on CBS.

Hanna-Barbera produces and releases in association with Marvel Comics Group, Fantastic Four, a half-hour series based on the popular Marvel comic book characters on ABC.

Yogi and His Friends is syndicated featuring some of Hanna-Barbera's classic cartoon stars, Snagglepuss, Huckleberry Hound, and Hokey Wolf, to name a few.

Hanna and Barbera are reunited with Gene Kelly in the one-hour Emmy Award­winning special Jack and the Beanstalk, produced and released by Hanna-Barbera and airing on NBC. This musical special combined live-action with animation and was based on the children's story of the same name.

Hanna-Barbera produces Abbott and Costello for RKO-Jomar Productions. Bud Abbott supplied the voice for his character in this animated series.

1968
Hanna-Barbera releases their first animated/live-action series on NBC entitled The Banana Splits Adventure Hour. This hour-long show contained live-action sequences of the Banana Splits (live actors dressed in animal suits), musical wraparounds starring the Splits, and Danger Island, a live-action serial show filmed in Mexico. All of the live-action segments were directed by Richard Donner. The series also contained three animated segments: Arabian Knights, The Three Musketeers, and Micro-Ventures.

Hanna-Barbera in association with Heatter-Quigley produces and releases Wacky Races, a half-hour series on CBS. The show is broken into two eleven-minute road races starring Dick Dastardly, Muttley, Penelope Pitstop, and others.

Hanna-Barbera releases a half-hour series entitled The Adventures of Gulliver on ABC.

The live-action/animated half-hour series The New Adventures of Huck Finn is released on NBC.

1969
Hanna-Barbera releases a new one-hour series starring a psychedelic musical group called The Cattanooga Cats on ABC. This series includes It's the Wolf, Around the World in 79 Days, and Autocat and Motormouse.

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! is released as a half-hour series on CBS. The show rebroadcasts on ABC several times and new episodes are produced in 1978.

Wacky Races do-badders, Dastardly and Muttley, star in a half-hour spin-off series entitled Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines released on CBS. This series contains cartoon minuettes featuring Muttley in fantasy-type scenarios entitled "Magnificent Muttley." Also featured is a character named Klunk who is voiced by Don Messick. Klunk is a character that has a unique language and is understood only by his partner Zilly, also voiced by Don Messick. Kluck's wild facial expressions fit every sound and syllable.

Another Wacky Races spin-off, The Perils of Penelope Pitstop, is released as a half-hour series on CBS.

1970
Where's Huddles? is released as a half-hour series on CBS.

Hanna-Barbera in association with Radio Comics, Inc. and Teenamation, Inc. produces and releases Josie and the Pussycats as a sci-fi mystery/musical half-hour series for CBS.

Motormouse and Autocat along with It's the Wolf are given their own half-hour time slot on ABC.

The Harlem Globetrotters is produced in association with Saperstein Productions and releases as a half-hour animated series on CBS.

1971
The Funky Phantom is released as a half-hour series on ABC.

Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm appear as young adults in Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm, a half-hour series released on CBS.

Help! It's the Hair Bear Bunch is released as a half-hour series on CBS.

1972
Gidget Makes the Wrong Connection is produced for Columbia Pictures and released as a one-hour special on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera releases Banana Splits in Hocus Pocus Park, starring the Banana Splits in both live-action and animated sequences. This one-hour special premieres on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera produces two late-night animated specials for Paramount Television, one starring Tom Bosley entitled Love and the Old Fashioned Father, and the other starring Richard Dawson who played Melvin Danger in Love and the Private Eye. Both specials aired as part of the Love American Style series.

The studio also produces and releases two half-hour animated specials, The Thanksgiving that Almost Wasn't and A Christmas Story.

Last of the Curlews, a one-hour animated special based on a book by Fred Bosworth regarding the possible extinction of the Eskimo Curlew species, is released and broadcast as an ABC Afterschool Special.

The New Scooby-Doo Movies are released as a one-hour series featuring famous celebrities in animated form including Don Knotts, Sandy Duncan, Sonny and Cher, Davy Jones, Cass Elliot, and Dick Van Dyke.

Hanna-Barbera produces and releases in association with American Leisure Concepts The Amazing Chan and the Chan Clan.

Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space is produced in association with Archie Comics and released as a half-hour series on CBS.

Sealab 2020 is released as a half-hour series on NBC.

The studio also releases The Flintstones Comedy Hour, which contained previously released Flintstones episodes and other assorted comedy segments including Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm.

Wait 'Till Your Father Gets Home is released as a half-hour syndicated series.

Hanna-Barbera releases Yogi's Ark Lark, based on the Noah's Ark tale from the Bible. This half-hour special premieres on ABC.

Oliver and the Artful Dodger is released as a two-hour special on ABC. It is based on the classic Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist.

Robin Hoodnik, an animated version of the classic fairy tale Robin Hood, starring animals in the lead roles, is released as a one-hour special on ABC.

Roman Holidays is released as a half-hour series on NBC.

1973
Hanna-Barbera wins an Emmy Award and the Golden Eagle Award for Last of the Curlews.

Hanna-Barbera in association with Sagittarius Productions produces Charlotte's Web, an Annie Award­winning animated full-length feature released by Paramount Pictures.

The studio produces Lost in Space for 20th Century Fox and Irwin Allen, a one-hour special based on its television show, airing on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera in association with the estate of Charles Addams produces and releases a half-hour series entitled The Addams Family based on Addams's famous comic strip characters.

The studio also releases Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kids, a half-hour series combining music and espionage on NBC.

Yogi's Gang is released as a half-hour series on ABC. Joining Yogi and Boo Boo are Snagglepuss, Wally Gator, and other Hanna-Barbera characters.

Speed Buggy is released as a half-hour series on CBS.

Super Friends is produced for Warner Bros. Television as a one-hour series airing on ABC. This show features DC Comic book characters such as Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman.

Hanna-Barbera produces Jeannie for Columbia Pictures as a half-hour series based on its popular television show I Dream of Jeannie.

Inch High Private Eye is released as a half-hour series on NBC.

Goober and the Ghost Chasers is released as a half-hour series on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera releases three one-hour syndicated specials under the banner Famous Classic Tales entitled 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, The Count of Monte Cristo, and The Three Musketeers.

Help! It's the Hair Bear Bunch is syndicated under the new title The Yo Yo Bears on CBS.

1974
Hong Kong Phooey, Devlin, and These are the Days, are released as half-hour series on ABC. Valley of the Dinosaurs is released as a half-hour series on CBS. Wheelie and the Chopper Bunch is released as a half-hour series on NBC.

Patridge Family: 2200 A.D. is produced for Columbia Pictures and released as a half-hour series on CBS. This show was based on its popular television sitcom.

Hanna-Barbera releases the ABC Afterschool Special entitled Cyrano, a one-hour animated adaptation of the play by Edmond Rostand.

1975
Hanna-Barbera produces all-new episodes of Tom and Jerry for MGM. Joining them is Hanna-Barbera's Grape Ape in the Tom and Jerry/Grape Ape Show, a one-hour series on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera releases an animated version of James Fenimore Cooper's story entitled Last of the Mohicans, another in a series of syndicated specials called Famous Classic Tales.

1976
Joseph Barbera and William Hanna receive their Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Phantom Rebel is released as a one-hour special on NBC.

Hanna-Barbera releases Davy Crockett on the Mississippi, a one hour special under the Famous Classic Tales banner on CBS.

The studio also releases Little Big League, a one-hour Flintstones special airing on NBC.

Hanna-Barbera releases another mystery-themed half-hour series on CBS entitled Clue Club, featuring two cowardly dogs, Woofer and Wimper.

Jabberjaw is released as a half-hour series on ABC.

The New Tom and Jerry/Grape Ape Show is produced for MGM and released as a one-hour series on ABC. Joining this show is Hanna-Barbera's Mumbley.

The Space Ghost/Frankenstein Jr. Show is released as a half-hour series on NBC.

The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Hour is released on ABC. Scooby's cousin Scooby-Dum makes his first appearance and Dynomutt teams up with the Blue Falcon--each had their own half-hour segments.

1977
Hanna-Barbera releases Five Weeks in a Balloon, under the Famous Classic Tales banner, an animated one-hour special based on the Jules Verne story, on CBS.

The Skatebirds is released as a one-hour series on CBS. This show is comprised of live-action sequences of costumed characters on roller skates and other cartoon segments Woofer and Wimper, Dog Detectives, The Robonic Stooges, and Mystery Island, a live-action segment.

Hanna-Barbera produces for Warner Bros. Television, The All-New Super Friends Hour, introducing the Wonder Twins, Zan and Jayna, along with their monkey Gleek.

Scooby's All-Star Laff-A-Lympics is released as a two-hour series on ABC. This series featured over forty of Hanna-Barbera's cartoon characters starring in sporting events. Other segments were Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels, The Blue Falcon and Dynomutt and episodes from Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! The series would change its name to Scooby's All-Stars and then Scooby's Laff-A-Lympics the following season.

Yabba Dabba Doo--Part 1 is released as a two-hour special on CBS.

The studio also releases a one-hour series that features C.B. Bears, the first of six cartoon segments; the others are Shake Rattle and Roll, Undercover Elephant, Heyyy, It's the King, Blast Off Buzzard, and Posse Impossible.

The syndicated half-hour series Fred Flintstone and Friends is released including previously broadcast episodes of The Flintstones Comedy Hour, Yogi's Gang, Goober and the Ghost Chasers, and Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm.

The syndicated package Fun World of Hanna-Barbera is released and includes episodes of Amazing Chan and the Chan Clan, The Funky Phantom, The Perils of Penelope Pitstop, Wacky Races, and Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines.

The studio also releases Hanna-Barbera's Flintstone Christmas, a one-hour animated television special for NBC.

Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels is released on ABC as a half-hour series.

1978
Funny World of Fred and Bunni is a one-hour animated/live-action special on CBS.

Hanna-Barbera, in association with Hungarofilm, produces the animated theatrical motion picture entitled Forever Like The Rose.

Hanna-Barbera, in association with Norman Maurer, re-releases under the new title The Three Robonic Stooges a half-hour series on CBS. It is paired with Woofer and Wimper, Dog Detectives.

Hanna-Barbera Productions releases an animated version of Anna Sewell's classic children's tale entitled Black Beauty, under the Famous Classic Tales banner airing on CBS.

Dynomutt, Dog Wonder is given its own half-hour time slot on ABC.

Another version of the Super Friends is produced for Warner Bros. Television entitled Challenge of the Super Friends. This series featured the diametrical Legion of Doom, DC Comics supervillians such as Riddler, Scarecrow, Lex Luthor, and Braniac.

Hanna-Barbera produces for King Features Syndicate The All-New Popeye Show containing various segments such as Dinky Dog, The Adventures of Popeye, and Popeye's Treasure Hunt. The next season the show added two new segments, Popeye's Sports Parade and Popeye Health and Safety Tips.

Yogi's Space Race Show is released as a ninety-minute series on NBC. The show is comprised of segments from Space Race, Galaxy Goof-Ups, The Buford Files, and Galloping Ghost.

Hanna-Barbera produces and releases in association with Toho Co. Ltd. and Benedict Pictures The Godzilla Power Hour, which includes Jana of the Jungle segments. Later in the season, the show is retitled Godzilla and the Super 90 to include classic Jonny Quest episodes.

Hanna-Barbera produces for King Features Syndicate a half-hour special entitled The Popeye Show, containing segments from the Saturday morning show entitled The All-New Popeye Hour.

Yogi Bear's Galaxy Goof-Ups is given its own time slot as a half-hour series on NBC.

1979
Hanna-Barbera in association with Harvey World Famous Comics produces and releases a half-hour series entitled Casper and the Angels and two animated television specials for NBC, Casper's First Christmas and Casper's Halloween Special.

Hanna-Barbera releases another Famous Classic Tales title Gulliver's Travels based on the John Swift classic.

Hanna-Barbera releases Buford and the Galloping Ghost, a mystery themed half-hour series comprised of two segments, The Buford Files and The Galloping Ghost.

The New Fred and Barney Show is released as a half-hour series on NBC and features Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm as teenagers.

Hanna-Barbera produces for King Features Syndicate a half-hour Popeye special entitled Sweet Hearts at Sea.

Fred and Barney Meet the Thing and Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo are released as ninety-minute shows on NBC.

Hanna-Barbera releases Yabba Dabba Doo­Part 2, a special saluting the careers of Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera.

Godzilla returns in The Godzilla Show. In November the series is retitled The Godzilla/Globetrotters Adventure Hour with the addition of the Harlem Globetrotters, then changed again to The Godzilla/Dynomutt Hour with Funky Phantom, and finally Hong Kong Phooey joined Godzilla to create The Godzilla/Hong Kong Phooey Hour.

Scooby and Scrappy-Doo is released as a half-hour series on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera in association with Saperstein Productions produces The Super Globetrotters as a half-hour series on NBC.

The World's Greatest Super Friends is produced for Warner Bros. Television and is released as a one-hour series on ABC.

Hanna-Barbera releases Scooby Goes Hollywood, a one-hour special premiering on ABC.

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